As Kurdish influence grows, statehood is still distant

Turkey and Iran flatly reject the possibility of an independent Kurdish mega-state; even uniting Syrian and Iraqi Kurds in a smaller entity will be difficult (source: macpixxel for GIS)
Turkey and Iran flatly reject the possibility of an independent Kurdish mega-state; even uniting Syrian and Iraqi Kurds in a smaller entity will be difficult (source: macpixxel for GIS)

War and chaos in Syria and Iraq have catapulted the Kurdish minorities in those countries into a position of unprecedented influence and even military power. Turkey is meanwhile waging a counterinsurgency campaign against the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) in the country’s southeast, while Iran’s relations with the Kurds and other national minorities remain tense. As their stature grows in this perpetually unstable region, could the Kurds be close to gaining their own independent state?

When it comes to the idea of a Kurdish mega-state stretching from Iran in the east to Syria in the west, and from Iraq’s Penjwin district in the south to the Turkish city of Kars in the north, the pros...

Not a subscriber yet?

Subscribe now and get the latest in-depth geopolitical analysis and forecasts from GIS’s unrivaled cadre of experts.

Learn more about our subscription plans.

You can also buy this report for €8.99 Buy

Add your comment