Balkans peace agreements end war but fail to bring stability 20 years on

US President Bill Clinton meets with Croatian President Franjo Tudjman (second right), Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic (centre) and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic prior to signing the Dayton peace agreement on Bosnia almost 20 years ago (photo: dpa)
US President Bill Clinton meets with Croatian President Franjo Tudjman (second right), Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic (centre) and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic prior to signing the Dayton peace agreement on Bosnia almost 20 years ago (photo: dpa)

The Dayton Peace Agreement for Bosnia and Herzegovina is almost 20 years old in November 2014. It was the first peace agreement after the Balkan wars of the 1990s. Four international peace agreements: the Rambouillet, the Kumanovo agreement, the Konchul agreement and the Ohrid Framework Agreement followed, but 20 years on these accords have failed to deliver full stability to the western Balkans.

PEACE treaties reached under international mediation ended the Balkans wars, but not their causes. Peace-building was not followed by democratic and functional state building, and in Kosovo a peace treaty has still not been signed with Serbia 15 years later.

With other countries ...

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