A woman sells chocolate sweets on a Ghana street

Ghana tries to balance its tax system for business and social needs

  • By international standards, income taxes in Ghana are moderate and its stable social security system has a good reputation
  • In 2006, corporate income tax in Ghana was reduced from 32.5 percent to 25 percent; significant tax breaks are offered to select industries and investment outside big cities
  • For the first 10 years of operation, companies in “industrial free zones” are exempt from corporate taxes

Ghana, the first sub-Saharan country to gain independence from European colonization in 1957, today is a multicultural democracy of some 27 million with one of Africa’s more diversified economies. The country’s generations-long quest to create a balanced tax regime helpful in attaining both developmental and social goals has scored notable successes and telling failures.

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 Charles Owiredu
Eleven types of business activity are identified as priority areas
read more about it in the report
What's inside
  • By international standards, income taxes in Ghana are moderate and its stable social security system has a good reputation
  • In 2006, corporate income tax in Ghana was reduced from 32.5 percent to 25 percent; significant tax breaks are offered to select industries and investment outside big cities
  • For the first 10 years of operation, companies in “industrial free zones” are exempt from corporate taxes
Who will benefit?
  • Report is targeted to the decision makers in cross country manufacturing – suppliers, manufacturers, logistics.
  • Also considered useful for the administrative university facilities, to better understand the possibe effects of current decisions.
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