Guinea-Bissau coup: Tribal rivalries resurface to block progress

The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) summit in Cote d'Ivoire urged members to plan a military deployment in the post-coup member states of Mali and Guinea-Bissau (photo:dpa)
The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) summit in Cote d'Ivoire urged members to plan a military deployment in the post-coup member states of Mali and Guinea-Bissau (photo:dpa)

Sanctions have been imposed on the military leaders who led the coup to topple Guinea-Bissau’s government. But old rivalries between ethnic groups and jealous neighbouring countries are influencing a longer-term solution to give the West African country a fresh start.

THE ROOT cause of Guinea-Bissau’s current problems, which led to a military coup on April 12, 2012, is the ‘tribalisation’ of the armed forces aggravated by political and military links with organised crime.

The personal ambitions of former President Kumba Yala (2000-2003) have also been a driving force behind the political and military crisis in the country - one of Africa's smallest w...

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