Hong Kong’s youth rebel against unification with China

Hong Kong, July 14, 2015: umbrella revolution student leaders Joshua Wong (R) and Nathan Law, protest before hearing charges of obstructing police and burning copies of a controversial State Council document (source: dpa)
Hong Kong, July 14, 2015: umbrella revolution student leaders Joshua Wong (R) and Nathan Law, protest before hearing charges of obstructing police and burning copies of a controversial State Council document (source: dpa)

Nearly a year and a half after Hong Kong’s “umbrella revolution” (Sept.-Dec. 2014), the legacy of the seemingly unsuccessful protest still dominates Hong Kong’s political debate. This adds a new twist to the city’s already complicated relations with Beijing, writes GIS Guest Expert Joseph Dobbs.

Perceived interference by Beijing in Hong Kong’s internal affairs casts further doubt over the longevity of the “one country, two systems” framework designed to protect Hong Kong’s autonomy after the British returned sovereignty over the city to the Chinese. Ongoing street protests led by young people, including the more recent, unusually violent riots, and the falling number of Hong Kongers ...

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