How can international aid for education reach the poorest?

Firdaus Flowers, a low-cost private school run in the slum area of Hyderabad, India, receives no international aid - but thrives (photo: P.Dixon)
Firdaus Flowers, a low-cost private school run in the slum area of Hyderabad, India, receives no international aid - but thrives (photo: P.Dixon)

Millions of dollars of international aid money destined for educational projects and schools in developing countries have ‘gone missing’. Fraud and corruption is rife and siphons off cash which would have provided an education for the young in emerging countries. Aid can encourage dependency and is part of the problem – not the solution, say experts who are now asking if international aid in the form of financial support should be stopped and, in the case of education, should be used to pay the poorest directly in education vouchers.

INTERNATIONAL aid is a relatively recent phenomenon. The Marshall Plan of 1948 which aimed to provide financial assistance to help rebuild European econo...

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