Kazakhstan-EU energy cooperation threatens Russian interests

The proposed Trans-Caspian Pipeline (TCP), with a capacity of 30 bcm, could connect Kazakhstan to the EU’s Southern Gas Corridor (source: macpixxel for GIS)
The proposed Trans-Caspian Pipeline (TCP), with a capacity of 30 bcm, could connect Kazakhstan to the EU’s Southern Gas Corridor (source: macpixxel for GIS)

In December 2015, the European Union and Kazakhstan signed a new “enhanced partnership and cooperation agreement,” which, among other things, calls for greater collaboration on energy issues. Closer ties – whether in the form of natural gas supplies or green technologies – could benefit both sides. However, the success of the initiative depends on how they approach Russia’s interests in the region.

The EU and Kazakhstan have steadily stepped up their energy partnership since the EU adopted its Central Asia strategy in 2007. In July 2015, the European Council had adopted an Energy Diplomacy Action Plan to support diversification, with a “focus on the

Not a subscriber yet?

Subscribe now and get the latest in-depth geopolitical analysis and forecasts from GIS’s unrivaled cadre of experts.

Learn more about our subscription plans.

You can also buy this report for €8.99 Buy

Add your comment