Migrations of the third millennium, part 3: Failed states multiply as West shuns ‘duty to intervene’

Niger: French soldier at the Fort Madama military base near the Libyan border; the area is on a main northbound route for African migrants (source: dpa)
Niger: French soldier at the Fort Madama military base near the Libyan border; the area is on a main northbound route for African migrants (source: dpa)

Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the international scene has rarely been so troubled, in so many different areas, and for such a variety of reasons. From Afghanistan to Central Africa, it seems that half the world is covered by hot spots. Unless the international community decides to embrace its ‘duty to intervene,’ their number will only increase.

The list of countries with teetering governments, or with no government at all, is growing fast: Somalia, Libya, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, the Central African Republic, Mali. This state of affairs appears to be long-term rather than transitional, and plays into the hands of extremists and those with expansionist ambitions.

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