Nato keeps door ajar for new members while casting wary eye on Russia and Greece

Member countries' flags fly at Nato headquarters in Brussels (photo: dpa)
Member countries' flags fly at Nato headquarters in Brussels (photo: dpa)

The next Nato summit, to be held in Warsaw in July 2016, may be the alliance’s fourth in a row without adding new members. Assuming the days of enlargement are over would be a mistake, because Nato’s ‘open door’ policy is one of the best ways to convince countries to reform their economies and governments. Failure to invite one of the four current applicants - Macedonia, Montenegro, Georgia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina - could also hand Russian President Vladimir Putin an easy victory on Nato's southern flank.

The 'open door' policy is critical to mobilising Europe and its allies around a collective transatlantic defence. According to Article 10 of the Washington treaty, any European ...

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