Putin’s strategic dilemmas: how Russia got itself in a bear trap in Ukraine

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (R) and Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu in Moscow's Red Square after a Victory Day military parade on May 9, 2015 (photo: dpa)
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (R) and Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu in Moscow's Red Square after a Victory Day military parade on May 9, 2015 (photo: dpa)

Russia made a strategic about turn in the international arena, through its annexation of Crimea and asymmetric aggression in eastern Ukraine. The post-Cold War setup in international relations, based on the idea of building a cooperative system of security in Europe, thus ended in 2014 – writes GIS guest expert General Professor Stanisław Koziej.

<i>Russia rejected the post-Cold War cooperative security system long proposed by the West. With President Vladimir Putin in the Kremlin, it opted for confrontation with the United States and Nato, and embarked on a neo-imperial policy toward its neighbours. His annexation of Crimea and asymmetric aggression in eastern Ukraine was met ...

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