Russian gas: The changing global market

Gazprom is doubling its capacity to deliver gas to the EU from Russia's massive gas fields with a second Nord Stream pipeline through the Baltic Sea (photo:dpa)
Gazprom is doubling its capacity to deliver gas to the EU from Russia's massive gas fields with a second Nord Stream pipeline through the Baltic Sea (photo:dpa)

Russia remains Europe’s largest oil and gas supplier, but this trading partnership is set to undergo major challenges. In the first of a series of five which examine the nature of these challenges, this report looks at why growth in future demand, particularly from Asia, and supply of unconventional gas from a number of countries around the world could impinge on Russia’s place as Europe’s main trading partner in gas.

DEMAND for energy between 2009 and 2035 is set to increase by 40 per cent, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA), with countries outside the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), particularly China and India, expected to account for 9...

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