Russia’s food sanctions - Do they make any sense?

Packs of sliced beef, ham and cheese are placed on the ground as part of a display of illegally imported food at Pulkovo airport in St. Petersburg. (photo: dpa)
Packs of sliced beef, ham and cheese are placed on the ground as part of a display of illegally imported food at Pulkovo airport in St. Petersburg. (photo: dpa)

Just over a year has now passed since the tragic downing, on July 17, 2014, of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17 over rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine. The atrocity triggered a war of sanctions and counter-sanctions between Russia and the West that has since wrought much damage, on trade and on political relations. From a Russian perspective, imposing sanctions may be counter-productive.

The Kremlin likes to emphasise that in a sanctions war, it is not only Russia that suffers. If current trends persist, the countries of the European Union and Switzerland may also be looking at substantial losses. Recent Austrian calculations suggest that 100 billion euros in output and two millio...

Not a subscriber yet?

Subscribe now and get the latest in-depth geopolitical analysis and forecasts from GIS’s unrivaled cadre of experts.

Learn more about our subscription plans.

You can also buy this report for €8.99 Buy

Add your comment