U.S. defense procurement to change after presidential election

Maryland, U.S., Oct. 28, 2015: An F-35 pilot’s helmet with dual ocular technology (front) and an F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft (source: dpa)
Maryland, U.S., Oct. 28, 2015: An F-35 pilot’s helmet with dual ocular technology (front) and an F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft (source: dpa)

For the rest of this election year, the United States military will endure a funding squeeze as politicians try to hold down federal spending. But rising demand for forces to operate against Daesh, (also known as Islamic State or ISIS) in the Middle East and South Asia is putting pressure on the Pentagon. Once the November elections are resolved, persistent public concerns about global security and a growing consensus that the armed forces need new organization and new weapons could lead to an upsurge in defense acquisitions.

While the United States continues to spend more on defense than any other nation, the demands being placed on its armed forces and their aging equipment have con...

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