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A U.S. ballistic missile interceptor is test-launched from Vandenberg air base in California

U.S. missile defense tries to keep ahead of North Korea and Iran

  • U.S. strategists still debate the strategic virtues and drawbacks of missile defense
  • But Congress strongly backs the idea amid threats from North Korea and Iran
  • The Trump administration is reviewing its missile-defense options now
  • Most likely, it will boost funding to move ahead on several promising systems

The progress of the United States’ strategic missile defense program tends to wax and wane, speeding up under Republican administrations and slowing down as Democratic presidents show more restraint. This trend seems to be holding. President Donald Trump’s administration is poised to put renewed emphasis on missile defense as a cornerstone of its defensive strategy. Look for the administration and Congress to place a higher priority on defending the homeland against attack by nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles.

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Dr. James Jay Carafano
Congress has some interest in space-based interceptors, but the idea is unlikely to get enough funding
read more about it in the report
What's inside
  • U.S. strategists still debate the strategic virtues and drawbacks of missile defense
  • But Congress strongly backs the idea amid threats from North Korea and Iran
  • The Trump administration is reviewing its missile-defense options now
  • Most likely, it will boost funding to move ahead on several promising systems
Who will benefit?
  • Report is targeted to the decision makers in cross country manufacturing – suppliers, manufacturers, logistics.
  • Also considered useful for the administrative university facilities, to better understand the possibe effects of current decisions.
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